The american beech (Fagus grandifolia) is a common fair-strength wood used for cheap materials such tools, furniture, and for fuel (Peterson field guide). It has an alternate leaf arrangement and simple complexity. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The american elm (Ulmus americana) is a tree population perhaps in danger from the dutch elm disease (Peterson Field Guide). It has alternate leaf arrangement and simple complexity. Its simple leaves that are serrated are unmistakable. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The american hackberry tree (Celtis occidentalis) is important economically and ecologically due to the sale of it’s wood and importance as a food source for birds (Peterson Field Guide). It has alternate leaf arrangement and simple complexity. It can be identified by the canyon-like ridges in its bark. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The black walnut (Juglans nigra) is a squirrel’s favorite tree! Their walnuts are eaten by the squirrels when they’re fattening up for winter. It has alternate leaf arrangement and they’re pinnately compound. They are easily identified by their walnuts which are big and green on the outside and black on the inside. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The famous (or in some cases infamous) ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra) is the state tree of Ohio and the mascot of my beloved school The Ohio State University. It has palmately compound leaves arranged oppositely. It’s easy to identify by its namesake brown and tan buckeyes with a spiny shell. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The shagbark hickory (Carya ovata) used to be used by Native Americans to cure illnesses (http://www.museum.state.il.us). It has pinnately compound leaves and alternate leaf arrangement. It’s easy to identify by its peeling bark, making it look like it had a sunburn and is now peeling. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is a very delicious tree when its sap is added to waffles (after it’s made into syrup, of course). It has opposite leaf arrangement and simple complexity. Its leaf is easy to tell from other trees because of our Canadian friends who made it popular by putting it on their flag. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.

The Sycamore tree (Platanus occidentalis) is definitely the coolest looking tree in the woods. It looks like an old painting that’s losing some of its paint. This makes it easy for anyone to identify. It has simple leaves arranged alternately. This tree was found in a dense wooded area at Deer Haven Preservation Park.